Snoop Dogg and Master P Allege Walmart and Post Consumer Brands Hindered Their Cereal Sales

Snoop Dogg
source: thefader.com

Renowned rappers Snoop Dogg, whose legal name is Calvin Broadus, and Master P, born Percy Miller, have taken legal action against retail giant Walmart Inc. and cereal manufacturer Post Consumer Brands. The lawsuit accuses these companies of deliberately undermining their venture into the breakfast food market by restricting the availability of their product, Snoop Cereal, in stores.

In 2022, Broadus and Miller established Broadus Foods with the mission to offer consumers affordable and high-quality breakfast options. Their flagship product, Snoop Cereal, was envisioned as a cornerstone of this initiative. However, the legal documents claim that when the duo approached Post Consumer Brands with their product, the company initially sought to acquire the brand outright. The rappers declined this offer, fearing it would compromise their long-term vision of passing the company on to their families.

Despite this setback, the suit alleges that Post Consumer Brands feigned support for Broadus Foods’ objectives, leading to a partnership agreement in December 2022. Under this agreement, Post was responsible for the production, marketing, distribution, and sales of Snoop Cereal. The product hit Walmart shelves in July, but the partnership soon soured as customers reported difficulty finding the cereal in stores, reported The Hill.

The lawsuit details how, in numerous Walmart locations across 20 states, Snoop Cereal was allegedly kept in stockrooms with specific instructions not to display the items on shelves. These boxes remained hidden from customers for extended periods, effectively absent from the sales floor. Furthermore, the lawsuit accuses Walmart of inflating the price of Snoop Cereal on its website to over $10 per box, significantly higher than typical cereal prices.

Adding insult to injury, the lawsuit claims that Snoop Cereal was intentionally placed in inappropriate sections of stores, such as the baby aisle, and was often sold at steep discounts, leading to financial losses for Broadus Foods. This alleged mishandling of the brand is described in the lawsuit as “diabolical,” hinting at a deliberate attempt to sabotage the product.

The rappers have enlisted civil rights attorney Ben Crump to represent them in this legal battle. Crump, in a recent press conference, condemned the companies’ actions as a blatant disregard for a Black-owned business, highlighting the broader issue of market barriers faced by minority entrepreneurs. He emphasized that the lawsuit aims not only to seek justice for Broadus and Miller but also to spotlight the systemic challenges that minority-owned businesses encounter in gaining equitable market opportunities.

Broadus Foods’ mission extends beyond profit, aiming to foster economic empowerment within minority communities and support charitable causes dedicated to combating hunger and homelessness. The lawsuit thus frames this legal dispute as not just a business disagreement but as a significant case concerning the treatment of minority entrepreneurs within the business sector.

In response to the allegations, a Walmart spokesperson expressed the company’s commitment to supporting entrepreneurs and mentioned various factors that influence product sales, including consumer demand and seasonality. The spokesperson assured that Walmart would address the complaint through the appropriate legal channels once formally served.

Post Consumer Brands echoed a similar sentiment, expressing disappointment over the lack of consumer interest in Snoop Cereal despite their investment and partnership with Broadus Foods. The company’s statement suggests that the cereal’s market performance did not align with initial expectations, framing the issue as one of consumer demand rather than corporate malfeasance.

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